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Latest News

Latest updates and news from the project

Update on progress and Clarence has a bath

As the others have mentioned, the birds have been developing quickly and have reached the stage where they can form larger groups. It is hard to describe the feelings of excitement I feel every time we reach a new stage of development with the birds. Having 10 individuals foraging around me without fighting (well mostly!) and following me around the exercise area is indescribable. I also find the clumsy attempts at practise take-offs a source of constant amusement, as they do not have flight feathers yet so just hop about looking excited, especially in blustery weather!

Video - The chick rearing process

A short video with Nigel sharing the rearing process of the young cranes at WWT's Crane School with fantastic footage of crane chicks.

Catching Cranes in Germany

  A radio tagged and ringed crane at the moment of release!

Cohorts of Cranes

a picture of cranes feeding together

Here are a couple of photos of the older birds at crane school taken on Tuesday this week.    These are all around five and a half weeks old and already nearly three feet tall, with wings growing rapidly.

Cranes on the Radio

Just finished interviewing for Radio 4's 'Saving Species' programme due to be aired tomorrow -

Tuesday 8th June - at 10am

The crew were almost as excited about the project as I am....and it really brought home to me how soon the imminent move to Somerset will be.   I'm off up to Slimbridge tomorrow to help out and am very excited to see how big these chicks have grown over the halfterm week -  More pictures of big cranes to follow!

 

Cranes Grace the Skies....

Weathervane photo with cranes

To celebrate the hatching of the first chicks as part of the project, Rod Fender of Black Forge Art has  donated this fabulous weathervane to The Pensthorpe Trust.  This now sits proudly on top of the visitor centre at Pensthorpe, where almost as soon as it was put up, a ‘fly past’ of two wild cranes took place!  Tim Nevard, said: “Although

Thistle picking and volunteers

At Crane School disease prevention is paramount and we have a lot of protocols in place to protect the birds from any nasty pathogens which might do our birds harm. One of the most important of these preventative measures was to cover the outside exercise area with twelve inches of subsoil when crane school was being constructed thus, burying any disease causing organisms that may have been present in the topsoil. This has so far worked well although on the down side it has become a wonderful seedbed for thistles.